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Division III Week Student-Athlete Spotlight: In My Own Words by Mitchell Bensman

Division III Week Student-Athlete Spotlight: In My Own Words by Mitchell Bensman

WASHINGTON – Gallaudet University athletics is proud to participate in the fourth annual NCAA Division III Week (April 6-12) in an effort to celebrate the impact athletics and Bison student-athletes have on our campus and surrounding community. GU is joining nearly 450 Division III institutions and 43 conferences in this week’s celebration.

To help focus on the many student-athletes that represent Gallaudet athletics we will spotlight a different student-athlete each day this week. You will learn more about them as they express their feelings on what it is like to be a Division III student-athlete here at Gallaudet.

Senior Mitchell Bensman (Russia, Ohio) is in his fourth season with the baseball team and on track to graduate this May with a degree in Physical Education and Recreation.  

In My Own Words: Mitchell Bensman

What is it like to be a student-athlete in college?
MB: It is not an easy thing to be a student-athlete in college, I learned that you have to manage your time for practices, games and split them up with school and assignments. I always like to finish my work as early as possible so I can focus on other things such as practice and my teammates. That takes a lot of commitment and effort, but it has given me memories that I have on and off the field and being a part of a successful baseball program.

What is it like to be a student-athlete at Gallaudet University?
MB: I had never thought I’d be a student at Gallaudet University because I never heard of it until my junior year of high school. I will have to say I am very glad to be a part of this amazing community because it is a place where deaf and hard of hearing students go for opportunities and to gain higher education. I am the only deaf child in my family along with two sisters and I got a lot of support from them to come here and broaden my experiences and improve my signing skills.

You have been a Gallaudet student-athlete and are also on the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC), can you tell us why you wanted to be a part of this organization and how it has influenced you and helped you grow as a student-athlete?
MB: This is my second year on the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee and fourth year playing baseball. I wanted to be a part of this organization to help young players from different sports succeed. I want them to be able to talk about any kind of concerns they have with their coaches or teammates that they would like my organization to talk about and try to solve. We want to bring these solutions back to that person and have them try it. This organization is not just about that, we also fundraise for Deaflympics and Special Olympics. It has helped me become more communicative with others and use all the different skills I have to think through situations and how to improve or solve them.

Division III Week Fact of the Day

Did you know that Division III student-athletes report greater involvement in volunteering than non-athletes.

Division III Week Student-Athlete Spotlight: In My Words
Wednesday: Todd Collins (Football) | Lindsay Corthell (Women's Track and Field)
Tuesday: John Isaacson (Men's Track and Field) | Kristi Luna (Softball)
Monday: Todd Bonheyo (Men's Basketball) | Brianna Stroud-Williams (Women's Swimming and Diving)

About Division III Week
Division III Week is a positive opportunity for all individuals associated with Division III to observe and celebrate the impact of athletics and of student-athletes on the campus and surrounding community. During the week, every Division III school and conference office is encouraged to conduct a type of outreach activity that falls into one of three categories: academic accomplishment; athletic experience; or leadership/community service/campus involvement. For more information log onto www.ncaa.org/about/division-iii-week-2015.

About Gallaudet

Gallaudet University, federally chartered in 1864, is a bilingual, diverse, multicultural institution of higher education that ensures the intellectual and professional advancement of deaf and hard of hearing individuals through American Sign Language and English. Gallaudet maintains a proud tradition of research and scholarly activity and prepares its graduates for career opportunities in a highly competitive, technological, and rapidly changing world. For more information about Gallaudet University please log onto www.gallaudet.edu.